The Moscow metro system
In 1938 the chief artist for Moscow's Mayakovski metro station urged Muscovites,"Raise your head, citizens, and you will see the sky." Forty meters below the surface, Soviets would find images "preparing them for labor and defense.

According to historian Andrew Jenks, the Soviet leaders used the metro's physical and symbolic fabrication to help stabilize a fractured social structure. So the metro system became not only an important mean of transportation for Muscovites upon its completion, but an important propaganda tool for the Party and Josef Stalin, stressing the success of Soviet system. – Kosmopolskaya and Mayakovskaya stations are examples of this.

Following the Stalin years, his successor Nikita Khrushchev favoured a different architectural style to Stalins lavish underground celebrations of the Soviet society. Krushchev issued an edict rejecting the metro's flamboyant architectural style in favor of a pre-fabricated, practical style, historian James Andrews has said. At the same time all over the city, de-Stalinization was happening, and street signs, busts of Stalin and station names were changed or removed. – VDNKh and Alexeyevskaya are examples of this.

After the downfall of communism and rise of capitalism, the current flavour of metro stations seems to be a return to the grandieur of Stalinist times. An example of this is the Dostoyevskaya station, which opened in 2010 to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the metro system. It features panels of the author Fyodor Dostoyevsky and characters from his novels. Another thing that characterises the metro in present day, is the rise of public-private partnerships. As an example, the Myakinino station was built with financing from billionaire Aras Agalarov, who wanted a stop at his shopping mall.


The metro system in Moscow is much more than just a daily commute for millions of Muscovites. Since its inception, it's also been an important tool for expressing the political agenda of the Soviet and Russian leadership.

In 1938 the chief artist for Moscow's Mayakovski metro station urged Muscovites,"Raise your head, citizens, and you will see the sky." Forty meters below the surface, Soviets would find images "preparing them for labor and defense.

According to historian Andrew Jenks, the Soviet leaders used the metro's physical and symbolic fabrication to help stabilize a fractured social structure. So the metro system became not only an important mean of transportation for Muscovites upon its completion, but an important propaganda tool for the Party and Josef Stalin, stressing the success of Soviet system. – Kosmopolskaya and Mayakovskaya stations are examples of this.

Following the Stalin years, his successor Nikita Khrushchev favoured a different architectural style to Stalins lavish underground celebrations of the Soviet society. Krushchev issued an edict rejecting the metro's flamboyant architectural style in favor of a pre-fabricated, practical style, historian James Andrews has said. At the same time all over the city, de-Stalinization was happening, and street signs, busts of Stalin and station names were changed or removed. – VDNKh and Alexeyevskaya are examples of this.

After the downfall of communism and rise of capitalism, the current flavour of metro stations seems to be a return to the grandieur of Stalinist times. An example of this is the Dostoyevskaya station, which opened in 2010 to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the metro system. It features panels of the author Fyodor Dostoyevsky and characters from his novels. Another thing that characterises the metro in present day, is the rise of public-private partnerships. As an example, the Myakinino station was built with financing from billionaire Aras Agalarov, who wanted a stop at his shopping mall.
Made on
Tilda